katrina v. katrina

Tuesday, September 06, 2005

 • Sigh...

Katrina and Cathie just visited the Red Cross in Fort Wayne. Katrina said they were handing out cash and assistance cards to victims of Katrina. When they were up in line, Cathie was refused assistance.

"Why?"

"We are only helping people with extenuating cirumstances."

"What about that last guy?"

"Well, he was rescued from the top of a house."

"So losing the use of your house to the hurricane, moving a thousand miles away and living with six other people is not extenuating?"

"No ma'am. But if your mother were to find herself homeless, we could probably help. Here's the number for the homeless hotline and if she becomes homelss and calls them, they will contact us."

"Great."

"You might try the unemployment office..."

I have never seen anything mismanaged more by the government than what's going on with the hurricane.

Cathie says that all the gas stations were closed in Washington Parish so they could bring in trucks to pump out the remaining gas to send to New Oreleans, essentially stranding the residents of Angie, Bogalusa, Varnado and Franklinton (pronounced FRANK-el-tn) without gas that was in thier towns!

I'm so glad you citizens in the private sector are doing so much to help, because the powers that be certainly aren't.

5 Comments:

At 9:49 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I couldn't disagree more. If that's the way the Red Cross is handling the assistance, I'm tempted to donate again. While I am not about to discount the trauma of losing absolutely everything, I would certainly not consider it an extenuating circumstance within the larger context of the situation. As your mother-in-law sleeps in a bed with a roof over her head tonight, there are thousands of people sleeping on the pavement or on a cot in a makeshift shelter. Not to mention the life sustaining medicinal needs of the elderly or even babies needing formula. Those are the folks whom I want my Red Cross donation to find its way to.

 
At 8:09 AM, Anonymous A former Red Cross DOnor said...

That's just it... YOu have no idea where your money goes! If you want to help in that way, go there yourself and hand it to someone. Don't be naive enough to think that donating to the Red Cross, which whom I spoke to and got the same schpiel as Cathie, will donate in the way you ASSUME they will. GO down there and help if you want to help that bad, or donate to another fund. The Red Cross is not using that money where it is needed. Just like 9/11, there are people making TONS off of this. Like the woman from 9/11 who was paid 6 MILLION by the Red Cross. She surely didn't need that damn much now did she?

 
At 5:50 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

[quote]I couldn't disagree more. If that's the way the Red Cross is handling the assistance, I'm tempted to donate again. While I am not about to discount the trauma of losing absolutely everything, I would certainly not consider it an extenuating circumstance within the larger context of the situation. As your mother-in-law sleeps in a bed with a roof over her head tonight, there are thousands of people sleeping on the pavement or on a cot in a makeshift shelter. Not to mention the life sustaining medicinal needs of the elderly or even babies needing formula. Those are the folks whom I want my Red Cross donation to find its way to.

I have to agree with this comment! I'm sorry that she is unable to use her home. I'm sorry that she is having to relocate, but there are people out there that have NOTHING! She got to load her stuff into a car, van and a trailer and there are others out there that didn't even have CLOTHES or shoes!!! Ugh... that really pisses me off.

 
At 2:22 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

when the government and the president declare a disaster area everyone there is supposed to get help. yes, the babies need formula and diapers, but what is the family supposed to do to support the mom that just got there? she is up in indiana because her family whent down there and got her, not because the government or the red cross helped her. would you feel better if she had stayed down there in a tore up house with no water or electric. if you are so worried about the babies and the sick people then open up your home to them, donate goods instead of money, rent a truck and drive down there yourself and drop off supplies or donate gas to someone that is brave enough to go down there there own selves. oh wait that is what the people on this blog did, but you don't support that. so go ahead and donate $10 to an institution that has paid employees and a million dollar director instead of getting up off your own comfortable butt in your own house with electricity and water and food and doing something yourself. go ahead and donate to the red crock, but you should know that it will make you feel a lot better than it will make the people that you think you are helping feel.

 
At 9:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

“….would you feel better if she had stayed down there in a tore up house with no water or electric.”

“…the people on this blog did, but you don't support that…”
etc, etc, etc.

I guess if you can’t attack the idea then you attack the person. :)

My original point being that I was glad the Red Cross was being judicious in handing out the money to those that most needed it. Just because you have some personal beef with the “red crock” doesn’t mean that those who’ve donated care any less than you do.

“…she is up in indiana because her family whent [sic] down there and got her, not because the government or the red cross helped her...”

Perfect. That’s the way it should be. I like hearing about families who look out for one another. We need more of that in this country.

“…but what is the family supposed to do to support the mom that just got there?...”

This was answered in the post “Thank You, Clarification, Update”. There are programs in place that will help them out. Will it be financially tight for awhile? Sure. Does it make all fair in the world? Of course not, but we all know about the absolute relationship between life and fairness.

The simple fact-of-the-matter is the mother-in-law is described as a “strong, independent woman.” Strong, independent people are the ones who make it in this world despite life’s failures and setbacks. I see no reason why this situation would be any different.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home

eXTReMe Tracker